Vice President’s Message

Brent Meyer
Brent Meyer
Brent J. Meyer
PORAC Vice President

After 18 years, more than $60 million and the efforts of thousands of people — both private citizens and cops — the National Law Enforcement Museum is finally set to open its doors. I’m excited to join with other PORAC leaders in a trek to Washington, D.C., to attend the October 13 grand opening event and celebrate this important benchmark in the history of our profession and our association. The PORAC Board of Directors has staunchly supported the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and its project of creating the first-ever museum dedicated to American law enforcement. The long journey to make this vision a reality spanned the tenures of two PORAC presidents, Ron Cottingham and Mike Durant, and we proudly contributed $500,000 to the effort, earning PORAC a place on the museum’s donor wall as a partner at the “Guardians of Justice” sponsorship level.

Our solid commitment to this project reflects PORAC’s leadership role in the national law enforcement dialogue, as well as our support for our membership. It represents a tribute to the sacrifices of the nearly 20,000 California peace officers who have lost their lives in furthering the noble ideals of our profession, as well as an appreciation for the continuing contributions of our members who protect and serve their communities every day. This museum will stand as a monument to heroes of yesterday, today and tomorrow, preserving and sharing the real and often untold stories of how law enforcement has shaped our nation. Its goal is to bring people together to learn about the past, discuss present issues and, ultimately, better understand each other. That’s a cause that’s more important today than ever before, and it certainly merits our enthusiastic support.

Appropriately located directly across the street from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial wall, the 57,000-square-foot museum has a world-class collection of more than 20,000 artifacts that depict the role that American law enforcement has played in society, from historic events to pop culture. But it’s not just a static series of displays — it will provide an immersive and interactive experience of what it’s like to walk in the shoes of a law enforcement officer, through workshops, simulations, role-playing, firsthand real-life accounts, multimedia and educational programs. Visitors can use forensic science to crack a case, act the part of an emergency dispatcher, try an authentic training simulator, explore the day-to-day activities of law enforcement and more. Offering a variety of perspectives from virtually every aspect of law enforcement, the museum also tells the tale of how our profession has been transformed by technology, spanning from the Old West to today and from local to federal.

Last year, I had an opportunity to see the progress of this project and was overwhelmed by the scope of what it would become. I can hardly wait to see the finished result of so much hard work, passion and creativity. I hope all of you and your families will soon have the opportunity to travel to Washington and experience this wonderful tribute to our profession for yourselves. In the meantime, check out lawenforcementmuseum.org for a preview of its many features and exhibits.

Past President Mike Durant and I had the opportunity to participate in some of the video storytelling projects that will live in the museum for decades, and I am incredibly grateful to have been a part of something so historic. Furthermore, I’m beyond proud that PORAC was able to serve as a significant contributor to this landmark achievement. I want to publicly recognize and thank our many member associations who participated in the additional fundraisers held on the West Coast to help bring this project to its completion. We are humbled by the distinct honor that the National Law Enforcement Museum brings to all of law enforcement — those who shaped the profession in the past, those who have been taken from us too soon and those who serve today. Ultimately, we hope the museum leaves a lasting impression on all who visit, helping them recognize the positive role that peace officers play in our society and inspiring the next generation of law enforcement to join our ranks.