Vice President’s Message

Vice President’s Message

From Day One in the Academy and the nearly 20 years since, I’ve known that our profession is under the microscope. We are big targets; easy to see coming. The police stand out, so it’s easy for some people to spot us and wait, ready for us to make a mistake. We are frequently called into situations where our presence isn’t welcome, and where the people we are sworn to protect are less than cooperative. And today, the microscope on us has grown more intense and powerful. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

A rush-hour traffic collision. An early morning bus accident. A motorcycle pursuit. Three everyday events in the life of a California peace officer. Three tasks we manage with absolute efficiency and professionalism countless times throughout our careers. But within 72 hours this past February, those three common and separate events began a horrifically fateful process that left three of our own dead in Whittier, Dublin and Sacramento. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

For years now, pension reform has been a popular topic on newspaper editorial pages and talk radio. In California, the pension reform discussion is often accompanied by an avalanche of alarming statistics and doomsday predictions. Massive numbers are tossed around to suggest the state is ready to sink beneath the weight of unfunded pension debt. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

In my nearly two decades as a police officer, I’ve taken hundreds of people into custody. But never have I done so to explore the arrestee’s immigration status. In practicing good tactics, the most important task for any officer when arresting someone is to secure the handcuffs quickly and safely to ensure a smooth transport to jail with minimal drama. Politics never enters the process. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

With a new legislative season underway in Sacramento, PORAC is busy meeting with State Senate and Assembly members. We are tracking bills, potential legislation and proposed laws that are being introduced into the pipeline, which will impact how law enforcement officers do their jobs. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

Some might call it “old school,” but I grew up in the profession when compliance was gained simply according to the doctrine of “Ask them; tell them; make them.” Nearly 20 years later, times have changed. From the street cop’s perspective, the hallmark of gaining compliance epitomizes two words: not negotiable. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

I’d like to start off this month by taking the opportunity to thank you and express my appreciation for your decision to re-elect me to represent you as PORAC’s Vice President for the next two years! I continue to be honored and humbled to serve you in this capacity for our Association. I anticipate a very productive and engaging 2017–2018, as we continue to improve the law enforcement profession in California. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

As you read this, we are near the start of our organization’s signature event for the year: the 64th Annual Conference of Members, which will take place at the most magical and happiest place on earth — Disneyland®! Again, we seem to have broken the record for attendance, selling out of the Conference room block just shy of a month after registration opened. Still, members and guests continued to register right up to the November 4 deadline, which ensures quite the full house for us after we all descend on Anaheim. Read More »

Vice President’s Message

Brent J. Meyer PORAC Vice President Where has the year gone?! In the midst of all that has gone on over the past nine months, we find ourselves in October and closing in on the end of the year. With the Annual Conference of Members just a month away, I am pleased to report that […] Read More »

Vice President’s Message

I was in the gym on the evening of July 7, when I found myself in an ironic moment. Both the cable news cameraman and I were running — he was struggling against a crowd of people stampeding over his position, and I was dashing ahead to an invisible endpoint five miles down the treadmill. Though our perspective was similar, our reasons were much different. Read More »